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in on these fiscal cliff talks. here is "the new york times" -- in the "financial times" this morning -- roger altman writing today in "the financial times." president obama will be meeting with several governors today at the white house to talk about the fiscal cliff. they will be meeting this morning around 10:00 a.m. eastern time, and then the governors are slated to hold a news conference at around 11:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for more details. washington insiders tackle fiscal cliff policy solutions. the group will hold a roundtable discussion today on the importance of reform to address the nation's debt and deficit spending this event takes place this morning around 8:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for all our coverage of the fiscal cliff talks. we have a web site set up so you can follow along on our special page for these fiscal cliff talks. back to your phone calls. good morning, doris. caller: good morning. the plan that the republicans offered, this is just the romney-ryan plan that the american voters said no to. other than destroying our earned benefit, i do not c
the fiscal cliff. that's the hill newspaper. here's politico this morning, inside the talk, fiscal cliff deal emerging is what some write this morning. and that's from politico this morning. first call up on our question this morning, g.o.p. says address the spending problem and in silver spring, maryland, democrat, good morning anne. caller: yes, well i would like the g.o.p. to be a little more specific because all of them who signed the pledge they want to slink government. i listen to c-span. they're so upset about ben gauzey, which they should be upset about, they don't take into account that the state department has a shoestring budget. people are very upset about the compounding, but the f.d.a. operates on a shoestring budget because they have been shrinking government. host: so anne, do you see room for cut? caller: yes, i see room for budget cuts in the defense department. i'm a senior citizen facing retirement, and i really do believe in some means testing for social security. it's an insurance program. and there are people, you're just like with your health insurance, if you're real
're going to have a look at republicans and the fiscal cliff negotiations with radio talk-show host and columnist armstong williams. that is coming up next as we continue the "washington journal." ♪ >> why a writers institute? i think it is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page. but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps -- but it is something -- there is something in literature that captures the humans. . >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany, on c-span to and it c-span3. span3.c- [bell rings] >> this weekend on c-span3, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to hiroshima. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. survivalant to argue or about the history. i think we are past that. my goal for behing here is to honor the dead nand listen to the living and do what i can to ensure this does not happen aga
are our troops dying and yet we just seem to go on and on talking about the fiscal cliff? well, i know that's important. mr. speaker, it is time for congress to realize that we are having young men and women to die in afghanistan for a failed policy that will not change one thing. mr. speaker, before closing, i make reference to this poster of a young american in a casket being carried by his colleagues to be buried. please, american people, put pressure on congress to bring our troops home now and not wait until december, 2014. i ask god to please bless our men and women in uniform, to please bless the loved ones who lost those in iraq and afghanistan. please, god, help get our troops home now and not later. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizing the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: mr. speaker, mitt romney weathered a storm of criticism late in the campaign after hurricane sandy for his earlier comments about privatizing fema and turning responsibility back to state and local governments. but during an era of fiscal restra
the connection to what we are talking about. caller: well, you're talking about the fiscal cliff. that could be sucked out. $1.5 trillion out of our economy a year for oil and war. that's texas and virginia. texas and virginia is your war. now you're talking about taxes. if voted -- go to delaware. that's where all your tax shelters are and your credit card companies. a trillion dollars in credit card debt. now you go to the state of new york -- host: you're saying overall states are the problem? >> there's three states in this country that are responsible for 95%. you have the east coast jews. host: ok. wild and wonderful from twitter this morning, better the fiscal cliff than the one that could result from a compromise for compromise's sake. on the democrats line, hi. caller: thank you for taking my call. host: go ahead. caller: no problem. i just wanted to say that, you know, -- awful smart guy came one some pretty good ideas. i live in right-wing -- i mean, this is very republican and conservative area, here. and just about everybody i know , the republicans want to see taxes raised on t
and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security trust insolvent five years sooner than they would if he did not have high oil prices. america needs jobs and growth. following the recommendations in our report will lead to both of those. it would be good for american business. >> i will start with senator alexander. tell me about energy policy and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held host
are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equivalent with natural gas and $4.10 diesel, so it makes great sense for our business. from a government point of view everybody today is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. our recommendations in the repo
of the fiscal cliff, let's talk about these for a moment. you have seen the headlines that say, saudi america. we have this new found richness, new technologies to find energy. i have seen some estimates up to 3 million new jobs directly related to the energy boom. is it real? how unfortunate of a driver will that be for the economy? when you're sitting down trying to figure out what growth will look like in this country, how does a factor in? >> in a few ways. number one, if there's one thing i feel more optimistic than i did one decade ago, i had a book out around 2006 and i felt like, when you are out making the case for why there should be more location as opposed to china and india, you felt like you how the wind in your face. you have great meetings but then they pull your side and say, that's a powerful argument, but we're moving this to bangalor next week. there is much more of an economic case for people to be relocating and bring jobs back. some of that is about the way it is structured between us and china and some of it is energy. no doubt the future of natural gas is just making
are going to be talking about the fiscal cliff, the statements the house speaker made about being a stalemate and what the president said during his trip to a toy factory in pennsylvania. here are the numbers. you can also reach out to us by e-mail and twitter and facebook, all of the social media as. on twitter the addresses @cspanwj, facebook.com/cspan. more from the article by jake sherman with the headline " fiscal cliff." he writes -- let's go to the phones. the first call comes from debbie in flint, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not done their jobs in the years. they need to listen to the american people. we picked barack obama up for a reason because we like his policies. they need to get a clue. they are already struggling and having a hard time. if they do not get a clue, they will not be back there. host: republicans say the president and democrats are not making any good-faith offers, the same thing democrats say about repub
different direction from the fiscal cliff and talk more about long-term and medium-term economic realities we face. in your written testimony to this committee, you warned against kicking the can down the road in definitely because of the adverse effect that might have on the economy. the medium and long-term impact it might have. i thought your analysis was definitely something we need to pay attention to. as you observed in the failure to make progress in this area now could signal that we have bigger troubles ahead. thatoody's analytics model you used breaks down about 2028. the reason it does that because at that point, the interest on our national debt will start to cripple our economy. we will be left without much recourse. i'm not sure there is a tax increase on the planet that could suddenly fix that. i'm not sure we could print money fast enough. if we did, we would go the way of argentina. i tend to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where is this. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanche
addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end of the bush tax cuts on those earning more than two and a $50,000. ed -- more than $250,000. ["hail to the chief" plays] please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joel glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you, guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and applause] now, i just finished getting a tour of the workshop. i have to say it makes me wish that joel invented this stuff sooner when i was a kid. back then, you couldn't build a roller coaster out of your erector set. i got a chance to meet some of the folks who have been working around the clock to keep up with the christmas rush. that is a good thing. these guys are santa's extra elves. they manufacture almost 3000 piece
the real problems, the fiscal cliff, and the other group is talking about the real problem, the debt and deficit. what is the real issue? we have $16.3 trillion in debt as a nation. $1 trillion of overspending or each year for the last four years. let me set the example of what this really means. in 2007, our tax revenue, how much we were bringing in the treasury, is almost exactly what it is in 2012. from 2007 to 2012, the revenue is almost identical. the difference is our spending has gone up $1 trillion a year. from 2007 to 2012. so over the course of that time it's slowly built up. but each year we've been over $1 trillion in spending. while our revenue has stayed consistent basically from 2007 to 2012, that spending has happened. we seemed to identify that is the real problem, we're overspending, and until you deal with that issue you can't raise taxes enough to be able to keep up with the $1 trillion of accelerated spending. what's the cliff? i have so many people from my district and other people, who catch me and pull me aside. we hear about the fiscal cliff. we are not even
a successful outcome not just for these fiscal cliff talks but also to this longer term issue of debt and deficit and economic growth. i was asked today to focus a little bit on what might be possible in terms of tax reform . i know tax reform and health care reform are the two topics we're discussing this morning. again, i look forward to hearing from gene and also this distinguished panel behind us. with regard to the tax and health care reform issues, i'll make a simple point which is that if we go through this fiscal cliff discussion and do not take advantage of that opportunity to put in place reforms to the entitlement programs, which are incredibly important, but also unsustainable, and if we do not take advantage of it to look at our tax system which is antiquated and outdated, inefficient, we will have squandered the opportunity to really address the longer term problem. we'll be right back on the cliff again. so, first fiscal cliff is approaching, we have to address it. if we do not we'll see about $500 billion in tax increases, we'll see huge across the board d arbitrary cu
about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act, and the future of the republican party on book tv. the senator has written several reports, including his latest, the debt bomb. that is live sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span-2. >> now we talk to a capitol hill reporter about the senate's work on the defense authorization bill. >> the senate has been in a holding pattern on the defense authorization bill, but finally found a way to start consideration of amendments. what broke the logjam? >> rand paul had a desire to bring an amendment that would have applied sixth amendment rights to citizens who had been taken in the war on terror on u.s. homeland. he was concerned he would not get the time. senator mccain is the ranking member of the armed services committee. he assured him he would not try to block the amendment. alternately, senator dianne feinstein agreed to what senator paul favors. that amendment was approved. >> there were several other notable amendments to the bill. can you tell us about those? >> the iran sanctions amendment would limit the type of materials re
to talk about the fiscal cliff. unfortunately, it's the president and members of his own party who were proposing that we let many small businesses, as in hundreds of thousands of them, go over the fiscal cliff. simply put, that's why we don't have an agreement as yet. they said yesterday this is not a game. i used to be a small business owner. small business owners are regular men and women from all backgrounds who, in today's economy, are facing challenges on a daily basis. and the president's tax increase would be another crippling blow for them while doing little to nothing to solve the bigger problem here, which is our national deficit and our national debt. this debt doesn't exist because we don't tax small businesses enough. it exists because washington continues to spend too much. raising taxes on small businesses instead of taking a balanced approach that also cuts spending is wrong. it's only going to make it harder for our economy to grow. and if our economy doesn't grow, americans don't get new jobs. and the debt problem that we have will continue to threaten our children's
mcconnell to talk about the so- called fiscal cliff. for more, go to our website, c- span.org. grover norquist of americans for tax reform talks about his no tax increase pledge. that is at c-span.org. tomorrow on "washington journal ," julie rovner discusses the health care law. kem dixon looks at the payroll tax cut that was enacted in 2010 and if the white house plans to extend it. then a discussion of whether will be extended and the impact on our current economy. plusher e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. >> on 16 or 17 basis in the united states we have military run schools. the average cost per child per year in those schools is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of the public education costs. the vast majority of our bases used public schools. we could take the money we are spending today, paying every public school system 14 dozen dollars per child, and save billions of dollars per year, and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend, you can talk with senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff and the future of the republican party. the senator has written several
in the fiscal cliff discussion, is we are talking about the past for the 2012 taxable year. -- unlike the rest of the fiscal cliff which effects rates that will apply next year. the patch applies for returns we file early next year. if there is no congressional action, there is an abrupt increase in tax on the 2012 taxable year. in 2011, approximately 4 million people paid the amt. if there is not a patch, 30 million people will be required to pay the amt in 2012, and they will pay an additional $90 billion in tax. very few of them have any idea this is on the table. host: is the irs prepared? guest: the irs is fairly unusual, but in a correct position, that congress will do the responsible thing -- they took the position that congress will do the responsible thing. they assumed congress will enact a package before the end of the year, and i think that was the reasonable thing to do because i believe they will do that. however, it does mean if there is not a patch of the tax return filing season next year will be quite chaotic. >> you can see all of that interview at c-span.org. we are live at
boehner and house republican leaders talk about fiscal cliff negotiations. he says he is optimistic a deal can be reached with the president. >> morning, everyone. going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and will her job creation in our country. republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal clef. one reason why we believe that we put revenue on the table as long as it is accompanied by serious spending cuts to avert a crisis. we believe this is the president's request for a balanced approach to this issue, and we are going to continue to work with the president to try to resolve this in a way that is fair for the american people. we all now that we have had the spending crisis coming at us like a freight train. it has to be dealt with. in order to try to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table. it is time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem our country has. i am optimistic. we can continue to work together to avert this crisis, sooner
talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka pata, and allison schwartz. i just finished getting a tour of the connects workshop. i have to say, it makes me wish that joel had invented this stuff a little sooner when i was a kid. back then, you couldn't really build a rollercoaster out of your erector set. i also got a chance to meet some of the folks who have been working around the clock to keep up with the christmas rush and that's a good thing.
is for them to say let's do this. people are talking about the fiscal cliff on january 16789 businesses have to start making decisions now projecting the environment they will be in on january 1. let's give those businesses the service, what they deserve and their employees bypassing this middle class income tax cut now. >> i'd just like to add that the chairman and assistant leader part pants in any number of these budget discussions, that, that or the other one. there were several of them. when they went to that table as representatives of the house democrats, they had no instruction except to reach agreement. they shared the values of our caucus but the over riding value was we had to get the job done for the american people. the only thing i said i wanted to see was jobs and economic growth would be at the centerpiece of the discussions and then whatever decisions we would make about investments or cutting them revenue or raising them would center around how we create jobs. that is the way we are going to reduce the deficit by creating jobs. and every step of the way, every time we came
talks about the so-called fiscal cliff. after that, former white house chief of staff staff join discussion on tax laws. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern, "washington journal" with congressman peter welch from vermont discussing the latest developments in the fiscal deadline negotiations. and then questions on the estate tax and capital gains taxes. washingtonrning's " journal," peter welch on the latest developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations. after that, in look at the estate tax which is set to go up at the end of the year unless congress and the white house at. "washington journal" is live this morning at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> today, politico hosted discussion with bob woodward, author of "the price of politics," and margaux rubio. mike allen moderates the discussion. see it live that to it -- at 8:10 a.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> this weekend, on c-span 3, american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to hiroshima as they prepare to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb. >> i don't want to argue to argue. at think we're past that. my whole purpose for bei
to this extraordinary country that we inherited. that being said, before we talk about fiscal cliff, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff-type scenario that created the scenario and ridiculous idea that i voted against, put a bunch of things bad to happen at one time. surprise, it didn't work and we are facing this. there are two issues number one, avoid doing damage and avoid doing harm. and we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short-term. and we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in. it's a fact and we have to address it. i approach this issue with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write o
and serious significant amount of money. >> this weekend you can talk about tom coburn above the fiscal cliff and the republican party in "in the." on c-span 2. >> his comments, the same day timothy geithner made the rounds on capitol hill, visiting with house and senate leaders, this is 10 minutes. >> the president has warned us about going over the fiscal cliff. his actions have not matched his public statements. members of his own party some quite comfortable with the sending his party over the fiscal cliff. two 6 ago had a comfortable conversation and the white house. i would say two thanks. despite declines the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have it to its various a barrel spending cuts. secondly, no progress has been made in the talks over the last a of weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for american leadership. it is the way ticket it done until washington. a mature0 lead and a had a meeting with his secretary. it was frank and d -- it was frank and direct. we saw to find out what the president i
travels to pennsylvania friday to talk about his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. the event is part of the white house's effort to cut public support to end the bush era tax cuts for incomes on $250,000 and above. it will be shown at noon eastern on c-span 3. >> washington worked his way up and went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to the lead minee industry was in its heyday. he arrived by stagecoach, by train and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin and slowly worked his way up and became a successful lawyer and got involved politically, ran for congress, search for 8 terms. he then befriended abraham lincoln, obviously from illinois, and ulysses s. grant, and as they were on the rise, he stayed with them as a close confidante and colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, he appointed washburn secretary of state. at that time, he became ill. his family feared for his life. after 10 days, he submitted his resignation to president grants. grant regretfully accepted his resignation. over the next several months, he reg
national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> mitch mcconnell talked about the fiscal click on the floor of the senate. the two parties first sat down to discuss the so-called fiscal cliff, it was widely assumed among republicans that president obama and democrats actually wanted to avoid it. that was the premise that any possible agreement had shown. that was the common goal, or so we thought. over the past couple of weeks it's become increasingly clear to many of us that we were simply wrong about that. incredibly, many top democrats, including the president, seemed perfectly happy -- perfectly happy -- to go off the cliff. that's why the president has been more interested in campaign rallies than actually negotiating a deal. and it explains why the president is now stubbornly insisting on raising tax rates when he himself said just last year that you could raise more revenue from capping deductions and closing loopholes. this isn't about the deficit for them or balance. it's about an ideological campaign that most americans thought would have ended on november 6, and that's also why t
, what's known as the fiscal cliff. and they're talking about the economy as well with the senate majority leader, harry reid, and house speaker, john boehner. this after a 90-minute meeting with president obama at the white house this morning where they called for a quick resolution. the governors spoke to reporters at the white house for 15 minutes after that meeting and we'll show you as much as we can until the house gavels in in just a few minutes. >> well, goorn, everybody. i'm jack, the chair of the national governors association, the governor of delaware, joined by governor fallen of oklahoma, she's the vice chair -- governor fallin of oklahoma, she's the vice chair. the governor of arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say was a very good meeting with the president. we came in part to make sure that the voices and the issues that we face as governors in states are heard and considered as part of the discussions going on here in washington. the president was very open to that. said we would continue to have a seat at the table. we
for everything he has done. [laughter] and now we can talk about the fiscal cliff. let me start off just by -- we will do the house rules, except we will cut in half. 30 seconds -- then we will have time to elaborate on all this. i want to go through the panel. what do think the odds are that some kind of the deal will be cut by january 1 in order to avoid sequestration and all the tax hikes? mark, i will start with you. >> i think it is 80% that we will avoid sequestration. the question is, though, is this going to be a big enough deal, and will actually be enough of a down payment that it will lead to something else subsequently that will actually avoid the kind of enormous consequences of $16 trillion of debt? that percentage will be lower than the 80%. >> let's come back to the big picture -- in the short term, by january 1 -- will we avoid the cliff? >> i think it is likely that we avoid it. it does not appear that that is going so well. it is so easy for us just to do the things we need to do. i think the real line in the sand is going to be the debt ceiling. i really do think -- i have sai
. we're talking about the so called "fiscal cliff" and our cameras have been covering all the events here in washington as both sides tried to negotiate their argument with. if you go to our web site, c- span.org, we have a special web pages at a side on the fiscal cliff and you can also send in your tweets. we will go to payton next in london, kentucky, a democrat. caller: thank you. i am one of the original baby boomers. i live in one of the poorest areas in the country, which is also heavily republican area of the country. i have always felt [indiscernible]. host: we are losing you. caller: this constant living curtailment from the republicans is a shameful way to protect the rich. host: we will leave it there. guest: he's right. our previous caller talked about he and his wife with a total income of $14,000 a year on social security, so he's right. he's not throwing money around. if you start to limit the cost of living to keep up with expenses, such as higher gas, higher rents, higher medical care,, and that makes it pretty tough. host: what are democrats willing to compromise o
about the tax component of this fiscal cliff and it absolutely is a tax component. we talk about taxes as it relates to small businesses and creating jobs. we talk about taxes as it relates to individual families and being able to make ends meet. but what this chart shows, mr. speaker, is spending and tax revenue of the federal government of the united states of america from 1947 out to 2077. and you can't see the intory indicate detail here, mr. speaker, but what you can see here from far, far away is this green line that represents tax revenue is a relatively flat and constant line. as a general rule it doesn't matter whether tax rate were the 90% marginal rates, the 70% marginal rates that they were when john f. kennedy was president and he cut taxes or whether they were 28 marginal rate during the reagan years. mr. speaker, it turns out -- and this is of no surprise to you -- turns out the american people are pretty smart. and if you raise taxes on this behavior, they switch to this behavior. and if you raise taxes on that behavior, they switch to this behavior. because at the end
're talking about fiscal cliff and tax issues. caller: thanks for taking my call. and i just think that the government is so corrupt and all in different departments, there's so much fraud going on, like the medicare program, the doctors and the insurance companies have brought the department so bad. they need some cleanup crew, cleanup people to check all the fraud that's going on. i watched american greed on tv and some people ought to watch. that i just watched it the other night, about the skin doctor that was cutting elderly people, special people that's on medicare, and he was -- so many doctors, when that first was passed when president johnson signed the bill into law, it was miss managed once the doctors didn't want it at first. they voted against it and the republican senators, i remember clearly. i -- i'm 85 years old. and i've paid taxes since i've been 15 years old. i've paid into the -- host: social security, medicare. caller: social security, i've paid into that all through my life. host: we appreciate you're watching, we appreciate you're calling. in any comment fir
are willing to advocate for what is right. i want to talk about that today. i want to -- fiscal cliff, the last time i use that term, because it's not that, but there are serious fiscal issues we should address. i want to talk about a few things we should not be discussing and don't need to talk about and one is social security. social security does not contribute to the deficit. it's not expiring. there's no reason we have to deal with social security right now. it is one of those things that some people who never liked social security, by the way, called it socialism even, want a change and has been wanting to change for decades, so they create this imagery of crisis coming at the end of the year, then what they are trying to do is say, well, we got to change social security because of the so-called fiscal cliff, although it's not really a cliff. so this is something that really shouldn't be on the table. i want to encourage folks to really discuss and get the facts, mr. speaker, because social security is solvent through 2037. doesn't need to be fixed -- does it need to be fixed? y
and the white house. house republican leaders have made a counter offer to president obama in the fiscal cliff negotiations proposing to cut to true knowledge with a combination of spending cuts come entitlement reform, and new tax revenues. there was a three page letter signed by speaker boehner, majority leader eric cantor, and other senior republicans including representative paul ryan. and this mornings "washington journal," we heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are
minority leader mitch mcconnell also talked about the so-called fiscal cliff on the floor of the senate. >> it was widely assumed among republicans that president obama and democrats back toward to avoid it. that was the common goal, or so we thought. over the past couple of weeks, and has become increasingly clear to many of us that we were simply wrong about that. incredibly, many top democrats, including the president, seemed perfectly happy to go off the cliff. that is why the president has been more interested in campaign rallies than actually negotiating a deal. that explains why the president is stubbornly insisting on raising tax rates when he himself said just last year that you raised more revenue from capping deductions than closing loopholes. this is not about the deficit for them, or balance. it's about an ideological campaign that most americans thought would have ended on november 6. the president said timothy geithner of beer with a proposal -- up here with a proposal that was more a provocation than a proposal, to be perfectly frank about it. it was a message that the p
leadership on the democratic side. we are talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. of course our cameras have been covering all of the events here in washington as both sides try to negotiate their argument with the public. if you go to our website, c-span.org, we have a special website setaside, webpage, c-span.org/fiscalcliff. or tweet us your thoughts using the #fiscal cliff. go ahead, payton. caller: thank you. i'm one of the original owners and i live in one of the poorest areas of the country which is one of the most highly republican areas of the country. i always intended if the republicans -- host: we are losing you, there. caller: somebody else is speaking. what i want to tell you is this cost of living is shameful way to protect the rich. host: we'll leave it there, payton. guest: he's got -- i can't add much to that. you're right. the previous caller who had talked making $14,000, he and his wife, their total income was $14,000 year on sfments he's not throwing -- on social security. he's not throwing money around. you start limiting the cost of living, the increases to keep
and that of money. >> you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act, and the future of the republican party on book tv. the senator has written several books including his latest "the debt bomb." join our conversation with your calls, e-mails, tweets, and comments with medical doctor and senator tom coburn. live sunday on c-span 2. >> he worked his way up into harvard law school and then at the urging of his brother in the great western illinois -- immigrated west to illinois, where the lead mining industry was in its heyday. he arrived by stagecoach and train and arrived on steamboat in this muddy mining town. he boarded himself in a log cabin, established a law practice in the log cabin, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer. he then got involved politically, ran for congress, serve for eight terms, and then befriended abraham lincoln, obviously from illinois. then ulysses s. grant. as they were on the rise, washburn stayed with them in a close colleague during the civil war. after grant was elected president, he initially
this on and to recognize with all the frenzy about the fiscal cliff that we have a history. some of the history is successful in resolving deep seated hard choices. that is will we will look back and talk about today and see whether we can learn any lessons from the experience. we will go over the detailed program in a few minutes. i want to introduce our keynote speaker tom davis. he has covered many basis. he was the county executive of fairfax county. he was the representative to congress and became a chair and it did many important hearings and remains very active as a speaker and a policy observer. he is also on our faculty where he teaches a course on southern politics that fills up five a minute after students get to register. a very popular lecture. tom will kick it off and i will come back and talk about the detailed program and we will give started. >> thank you very much. i left congress undefeated and unindicted. i just want to welcome you on behalf of george mason university, the bipartisan policy center. mark twain once said history does not repeat itself, but it's sometimes rhyme
incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interesting, distributional characteristics. that tends to be money that comes from higher income folks. as you think about the political process trying to structure when a package with a revenue goal and a distribution goal, my prediction is you will see at least some of those increases occur. i personally would be surprised if the dividend rate went back up to ordinary rates. the senate would allow it to stay at the capital gains rate, and go it to 15% to 20%. the president initially proposed cutting dividends they the same as capital gains. -- proposed letting dividends stay the same as capital gains. my guess would be that that
of this year. then, senator orrin hatch from utah gives the republican address on the fiscal cliff which refers to automatic tax increases and spending cuts that would go into effect in 2013. >> hi, everybody. i'm here on the factory floor of a business in hatfield, pennsylvania, where folks are working around the clock making toys to keep up with the christmas rush. and i came here because, back in washington, the clock is ticking on some important decisions that will have a real impact on our businesses - and on families like yours. the most pressing decision has to do with your taxes. see, at the end of the year, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a typical middle class family of four will see their income taxes rise by $2,200. we can't let that happen. our families can't afford it, and neither can our economy. the second option is better. right now, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,
spending in washington and finally address the problem. >> as we continue to try to solve the fiscal cliff, the thing week of always continued to look at is our economy. wanting it to continue to grow. today in the whip's office we'll have small family-owned businesses in there talking about ways that we can protect the family business, continue to grow, while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day, as we walk the halls, you continue to ask questions. you want the answers solving the fiscal cliff. we put an answer on the table. the president now has to engage. i think the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give you an answer of where we're going. this is an opportunity for this country to lead. this is an opportunity for the president to lead. >> at these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem. it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a r
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